Managing invasive species better than eliminating them: research

Every year, hundreds of introduced species cause billions of dollars in damage

Managing invasive species better than eliminating them: researchManaging invasive species – not eliminating them altogether – is a better use of time and conservation resources in many cases, according to a study led by a University of Alberta biologist. Every year, hundreds of introduced species cause billions of dollars in damage to ecosystems, agriculture and infrastructure in North America alone. The research,…

Covid-19 news coverage based more on #fearporn than science

Journalists eager to echo doomsday alarms about pandemic case numbers while ignoring the social devastation of lockdown policies

Covid-19 news coverage based more on #fearporn than scienceIt has long been accepted both within and without the world of journalism that negative news trumps developments of a positive nature pretty much every time. Much may have changed in how news is delivered to people but the old cliches – “if it bleeds it leads” and “newspapers don’t report when airplanes land safely”…

COVID-19 puts girls in low- and middle-income countries in peril

COVID-19 puts girls in low- and middle-income countries in perilAn increase in child marriages, unintended pregnancies, unsafe abortions and sexual violence is likely to be seen for years in low-and middle-income countries as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a University of Alberta nursing researcher who is leading an international study to address the problem. “In many countries all the health services…

Measuring the risk of heart disease, diabetes in obese children

Type of cholesterol produced as food consumed a strong predictor of future health risk

University of Alberta researchers have found a new, more effective way to measure future heart disease and diabetes risk in youth. By testing the blood for remnant cholesterol (RC), made by the body during the day as food is consumed, researchers were able to show that this non-fasting type of cholesterol is a strong predictor…

How to help young immigrants reach post-secondary education

Arts-based research project will help young Syrian women articulate the challenges they face – and the supports they’ve found

How to help young immigrants reach post-secondary educationJasmine Nathoo considered herself fortunate as she joined high-school classes after moving from Kenya to Canada as a teen. She already spoke English and came from an academically strong program. Yet it was still a challenge. “I had to repeat some courses which weren’t recognized. I was having to advocate for myself in the school…

Fireball was a comet fragment burning up in Earth’s atmosphere

U of A scientists use fireball monitoring network to capture images of the meteor that lit up the skies over Western Canada

Fireball was a comet fragment burning up in Earth’s atmosphereWestern Canadians caught a glimpse of a bright flash overhead this week as a fireball lit up the sky on the morning of Feb. 22. Now, University of Alberta researchers have used Western Canada’s most advanced fireball network to capture images and trajectory of the fireball – revealing it to be a small piece of…

U of A spinoff, U.S. firm merge to commercialize transplant technology

Bridge to Life commits US$10 million to clinical trial and commercial development of Tevosol Ex-Vivo Organ Support System

U of A spinoff, U.S. firm merge to commercialize transplant technologyUniversity of Alberta spinoff company Tevosol has merged with the U.S.-based medical technology company Bridge to Life, bringing its game-changing organ transplant devices a step closer to approval, manufacture and global distribution. While Tevosol will remain based in Edmonton, Bridge to Life has committed US$10 million to a multi-centre clinical trial and commercial development of Tevosol’s Ex-Vivo Organ Support…

High-tech rehabilitative platform connects rural Albertans to specialists

Platform allows specialists to offer physiotherapy expertise for patients in smaller communities

High-tech rehabilitative platform connects rural Albertans to specialistsThe human touch of a high-tech University of Alberta project is starting to be felt by rural Alberta physiotherapy patients on the road to recovery. The specialized assessments made possible through a telehealth project that began last summer are moving patients in small communities to tears of relief as they get the help they need.…

How zebra finches choose materials for their nests

U of A scientists find that learning and past success play a role in how birds build their nests

How zebra finches choose materials for their nestsWhen building a nest, previous experience raising chicks will influence the choices birds make, according to a new study by University of Alberta scientists. The results show that birds that have successfully raised families stick with tried-and-true methods when building their nests, whereas less successful birds will try something new. “We found that when presented…

Why some women fought back against Boko Haram atrocities

The Islamist group has killed tens of thousands and displaced more than 2.3 million people since 2009

Why some women fought back against Boko Haram atrocitiesThe world reacted with shock and horror when 276 Nigerian schoolgirls were kidnapped by Boko Haram in 2014. Some of the girls managed to escape, others were rescued by military forces, but many were coerced into serving the group’s terrorist agenda, some acting as suicide bombers. While the mass abduction in the small Nigerian town…
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