Pierre Poilievre’s prospects and perils

Conventional wisdom holds he may win the leadership but not a general election

Pierre Poilievre’s prospects and perilsPierre Poilievre is making waves. Virtually all of the buzz in the federal Conservative leadership race revolves around him. He’s pulling in crowds, generating headlines and tossing out ideas that intrigue some and unnerve others. Excitement isn’t a word normally associated with Canadian conservatism. But, for better or worse, Poilievre stirs it up. And some…

One Indigenous inquiry after another proves fruitless

All the social and justice indicators show that things have only worsened among Indigenous peoples

One Indigenous inquiry after another proves fruitlessThe March 9, 1988, police shooting of J.J. Harper on the streets of Winnipeg and the much earlier murder of Helen Betty Osborne in The Pas in 1971 led Manitoba Premier Howard Pawley’s government to commission the Aboriginal Justice Inquiry (AJI) on April 13, 1988. This occurred in the middle of the election campaign that…

Why has Canadian citizenship become an oxymoron?

The country may be falling apart

Why has Canadian citizenship become an oxymoron?Canadian citizenship is under attack. Over the past 20 years, the public’s commitment to Canada appears to be waning. With billions of dollars in emergency pandemic assistance and promises of almost free childcare, a targeted dental program, new investments in housing and health care, and a stream of almost “free” social programs, one would think…

Why is Canada’s chief archivist rewriting our history?

Has ordered a purge of documents that “may offend people”

Why is Canada’s chief archivist rewriting our history?Nikolai Ivanovich Yezhov was not a nice man but, for a time, he was an important one. He was a favourite of Soviet dictator Joseph Stalin and was head of the NKVD, the Soviet Union’s secret police. He was responsible for the arrests, tortures and executions during his master’s Great Purge of 1936 to 1938.…

Canada’s Charter of Rights and Freedoms matters now more than ever

Governments in Canada are violating the Charter relating to individual freedoms

Canada’s Charter of Rights and Freedoms matters now more than everNow is the time for a regroup, a refresh. The fight over the removal of the vaccine mandates is just one battle, not the war. The war is that the mandates were and are unconstitutional. They must be found to have been unconstitutional, that they have all violated the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms.…

Mentors are key to embracing new Canadians

An important lesson for nation-building in Canada

Mentors are key to embracing new CanadiansAs a new Canadian, I was fortunate to have had the guidance and mentorship of many outstanding Canadian role models. They helped pave my integration into a new society and provided me with invaluable advice for my professional career. There’s an important lesson here for nation-building in Canada. Bringing immigrants to Canada is only half…

What holds Canada together?

It certainly isn't any sense of national purpose

What holds Canada together?As long as I’ve been following politics (which is almost as long as I’ve been alive), the question of what defines Canada has provided unsatisfying answers. Polls typically tell us that some combination of the Charter of Rights, our health care system, and the fact that we are not American top the list. Canadians generally…

Ted Byfield played an influential role in Canadian conservatism

In all parts of the country

Ted Byfield played an influential role in Canadian conservatismTed Byfield passed away at his home on Dec. 23 at age 93. Many Canadian conservatives mourn the loss of a great man. Byfield was a giant in Canadian conservatism. He consistently challenged existing orthodoxies and societal norms within modern liberalism and helped create an intellectual blueprint for a political movement that had often struggled…

Celebrating Christmas in 18th and 19th century Alberta

Christmas was more primitive in the 18th and mid-19th centuries, but it was still Christmas

Celebrating Christmas in 18th and 19th century AlbertaTurn the clock back to the late 18th century and mid-19th century Alberta, and chances are you’d be eating fish, beavertail, and stewed moose rather than roasted turkey and honey-glazed ham for Christmas dinner. Instead of rockin’ to tunes emanating from audio systems and streaming services, you’re more likely to be dancing the jig to…

Canada’s most durable prime minister was cut from a different cloth

But the idea of someone like William Lyon Mackenzie King winning six terms today boggles the mind

Canada’s most durable prime minister was cut from a different clothThis month marks a notable centenary in Canadian political history. On December 6, 1921, William Lyon Mackenzie King won his first federal election and was duly sworn in as prime minister 23 days later. He went on to spend more than 21 years in office over a 27 year span, which makes him the longest-serving…
1 2 3 10