How will we deal with our ever-rising national debt?

How do we sustain large deficits, wind them down and gradually slow the debt accumulation?

How will we deal with our ever-rising national debt?Ordinary Canadians have begun worrying about something that usually only ‘dismal scientists’ – i.e. economists – care about: our alarming federal and provincial deficits and exploding government debt. Putting an economy into lockdown was assuredly going to reduce tax revenues and increase transfers to individuals and businesses to ameliorate the devastation wrought by the COVID-19…

Why oil and gas are fundamental to Canada

The $493 billion in oil and gas revenues paid to governments since 2000 is more than family allowance and children’s benefits since 1970

Why oil and gas are fundamental to CanadaBy Mark Milke and Lennie Kaplan Canadian Energy Centre Humans are wired to respond to stories that paint a relatable picture of an issue at hand. And those stories are easier to remember. If we repeat a Rex Murphy story about how out-of-work cod fishery workers from Newfoundland saved their homes and marriages by moving…

Alberta’s debt was unsustainable even before COVID-19

Analysis shows Alberta must significantly reduce spending relative to the size of the economy or raise taxes

Alberta’s debt was unsustainable even before COVID-19By Tegan Hill and Ben Eisen The Fraser Institute The Alberta government will release a three-year fiscal update later this month, and will be tempted to blame the province’s fiscal challenges on COVID-19. In reality, Alberta’s finances were unsustainable long before the pandemic hit. While the COVID-19-induced recession has certainly contributed to the province’s eye-popping…

Canada moving towards U.S.-style ‘spend now, pay later’ government

Canadians love receiving government largesse, as long as someone else is paying for it, even if it is their kids

Canada moving towards U.S.-style ‘spend now, pay later’ governmentBy Jason Clemens and Milagros Palacios The Fraser Institute Pulitzer Prize-winning author George Will has repeatedly argued that, contrary to conventional wisdom, there is enormous consensus in Washington, D.C. – borrow today to finance spending and tax cuts but leave the costs (i.e. taxes) to the next generation. There are increasing signs that Canadians are…

Alberta taxpayers should be complaining, not union bosses

Alberta taxpayers should be complaining, not union bossesEvery government-employee paycheque ultimately comes from taxpayers. That seems like an obvious point. But union bosses seem to need a reminder. Surrounded by striking government employees in Alberta Union of Provincial Employees garb, union boss Guy Smith claimed that “only in Alberta do they not give you the resources you need to do the work…

Trudeau’s cavalier attitude towards debt is troubling

The prime minister needs to reconsider his love of debt before Canadians decide it is time for him to go

Trudeau’s cavalier attitude towards debt is troublingIt turns out that Prime Minister Justin Trudeau doesn’t think now is the time for a fiscal anchor to set some limits on government spending. That shouldn’t really surprise anyone, because he also didn’t think his first four years in office were the right time for one either. Most Canadians will recall Trudeau’s 2015 election…

Poll exposes key problems with a national pharmacare plan

Rather than covering every Canadian for drugs they can already afford, we should focus on those who fall through the cracks

Poll exposes key problems with a national pharmacare planWith fears related to COVID-19 and the economy running high, a new poll by the Angus Reid Institute reveals near universal support for some sort of public pharmacare plan. However, it also inadvertently revealed that, despite such support, most Canadians don’t actually need it. Conducted in partnership with a list of experts who have long…

Think 2020 is tough? 2021 shaping up to be even tougher

The year’s hardships, and concern for what’s next in 2021, can refocus our vision and practices at the personal and social levels

Think 2020 is tough? 2021 shaping up to be even tougherAs we enter the final quarter of this year, many Canadians are likely more than ready to say goodbye and good riddance to 2020, the year of the pandemic. But what if, in some ways at least, 2021 could actually be even more difficult? Consider this: Besides killing nearly 10,000 Canadians and more than one…

Trudeau’s infrastructure announcement raises red flags

Every dollar spent on white elephant vanity projects reduces the money that could be spent on schools, hospitals

Trudeau’s infrastructure announcement raises red flagsIf a door-to-door salesman pitched you on a “win-win” sale, your first reaction would probably be skepticism. Unfortunately, a similar level of skepticism is called for whenever a politician declares their latest spending project to be a “win-win.” That’s exactly what Prime Minister Justin Trudeau affirmed was the case when he announced that the “independent”…
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